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Pz.Kpfw.III Ausf.N w/side-skirt armor

Kit #: 7407

Preview by Rob Haelterman
and Timothy Lau

1. A little bit of (technical) history (mostly based on [1])

(For those wondering why I start with the Ausf. J, patience, everything will be revealed.)

Even though some sources beg to differ, [1] states that the Ausf. J, L, M and N were all called 8.Serie/Z.W. by the manufacturers, which were Daimler-Benz, MAN, MIAG, MNH, Henschel and Alkett. (For the record, the Ausf. K was never built.)
Production of these subvariants started in March 1941 and ran until August 1943, after which production was switched entirely to the StuG III. This means that no vehicles left the factory with Zimmerit, even though some vehicles were covered with the paste in the field (or during revisions).

  • 1.1. Ausf. J
    Produced from 03/41 to 04/42.
    This was the first of the 8.Z.W. vehicles and represented a substantial redesign from previous models. (For the modeler, this means that converting an Ausf. H into a J, or vice versa, borders on black magic.)
    New feautures were:
    • 50mm frontal armor, with new driver’s visor.
    • One piece transmission hatches with splash guard for driver.
    • Welded ventilator covers for the transmission in front of the hatches.
    • Extended hull sides with tow eye.
    • Engine deck extended to rear, with smoke candles underneath.
    • 50mm L/42 gun (already present on the Ausf. H).
    • The engine deck was still "flat", i.e. without ventilation covers.

    During production the following changes were made

    • 04/41: the Rommelkiste becomes standard. I doubt that any Ausf.J ever arrived at the front without it.
    • 05/41: New turret front. Early turrets still had 30mm fronts, while later versions had the prescribed 50mm.
      Externally these were (almost) identical, except for the lack of a deflector in front of the lateral visors on the "50mm" turret.
    • 12/41-03/42: parallel production of L/42 and L/60 armed vehicles. Afterwards only L/60.
      Note: L/60 armed tanks were later renamed Ausf. L.
    • 03/41: A tropical version was produced. The modification was very similar to previous models with three large and two small ventilation covers on the engine deck, all transversially oriented.
    • 07/41: Shortages in the stronger shock absorbers are solved. No Ausf.J. with the previous model delivered anymore.
    • 08/41: Exhaust deflector (also retrofitted).
    • 11/41: Spare tracks on the nose (also retrofitted).
    • 12/41: Spaced armor available for the driver's front plate and mantlet. Not universally fitted to the L/42 variant. (I would even say rarely ever fitted.)
    • 12/41: All tanks get engine decks with single hatches (instead of split hatches). Ventilation covers on these hatches are longitudinally placed. The ventilation covers at the rear are bigger but still longitudinally placed.
    • 03/42: Visors in turret side and right mantlet gradually dropped.
    • 04/42: L/60 armored Ausf.J retroactively renamed Ausf.L
  • 1.2. Ausf. L
    Produced from 04/42 to 10/42 (although one can claim the first Ausf.L was actually produced in 12/41 as this was the time the Ausf. J received the longer gun.)

    During production the following changes were made:

    • 12/41: Spaced armor available for the driver's front plate and mantlet. Not universally fitted at first. Relatively high number only fitted with frame for extra mantlet armor, but not the armor itself.
    • 12/41: All tanks get engine decks with single hatches (instead of split hatches). Ventilation covers on these hatches are longitudinally placed. The ventilation covers at the rear are bigger but still longitudinally placed.
    • 03/42: Visors in turret side and right mantlet gradually dropped.
    • 05-06/42: Small lights and horn on fender disappear.
    • 06/42: Plate at the sides of the spaced mantlet armor no longer fitted.
    • 06-10/42: Turret splash guard gradually disappears. (It is no longer needed because of the height of the extra armor in front of the driver.)
    • 06-10/42: Hull side escape hatches gradually disappear.
    • 09/42: Bosch headlights replace Notek.
    • 09/42: Tow coupling installed (also retrofitted).
    • 09/42: Nebelkerzen installed on turret; droppped at rear.
    • 10/42: Rear convoy light replaced by cylindrical light.
    • 10/42: Winterketten available.
    • 05/43: Nebelkerzen removed.
    • 05/43: Schürzen fitted (also available for retrofit).
    • 05/43: AA mount on turret (also available for retrofit).
  • 1.3. Ausf. M
    The Ausf. M is basically an Ausf. L with increased fordability. The main distinguishing feature is the exhaust which curves up from below the rear hull into a cylindrical muffler with an extra, minor feature, being the sealing mechanism on the lateral engine vents. The inspection/escape hatches on the nose were also internally hinged.
    Produced from 09/42 to 02/43.

    During production the following changes were made

    • 10/42: Rear convoy light replaced by cylindrical light.
    • 10/42: Winterketten available.
    • 05/43: Nebelkerzen removed.
    • 05/43: Schürzen fiited (also available for retrofit).
    • 05/43: AA mount on turret (also available for retrofit).

    It seems Ausf. M did not have the small rear light on the right rear fender. As a consequence, the right rear fender no longer had a hole in it.

  • 1.4. Ausf. N

    1.4.1. First production batch
    The first production batch are basically late Ausf. L equipped with surplus 75mm L/24 guns (and sometimes associated cleaning rods).
    Produced from 07/42 to 10/42.
    Modifications follow the production of the Ausf.L:
    • Visors in turret side and right mantlet should be rare by now but could technically still be fitted..
    • Turret splash guard gradually disappears. It should also have become rare by now.
    • Hull side hatches gradually disappear. Idem.
    • 09/42: Bosch headlights replace Notek.
    • 09/42: Tow coupling installed.
    • 09/42: Nebelkerzen installed on turret; droppped at rear.
    • 10/42: Rear convoy light replaced by cylindrical light.
    • 05/43: Nebelkerzen removed (this might have been done as a setrofit).
    • 05/43: Schürzen fiited (also available for retrofit).
    • 05/43: AA mount on turret (also available for retrofit).


    1.4.2. Second production batch
    The second batch are basically late Ausf. M equipped with with re-assembled 75mm L/24 guns.
    Produced from 02/43 to 08/43.
    Modifications during production include:

    • 02/43: Two holes for driver's periscope no longer provided.
    • 03/43: New cupola with single lid hatch.
    • 05/43: Nebelkerzen removed (this might have been done as a setrofit).
    • 05/43: Schürzen fiited (also available for retrofit).
    • 05/43: AA mount on turret (also available for retrofit).


    1.4.3. Third production batch
    The third production batch consisted of remanufactured vehicles. Mostly these were Ausf.J, L and M.
    Produced from 07/43 to 06/44. Some of these might have received Zimmerit during the remanufacturing process.


    1.4.4. Remark
    Note that because of the weight of the gun, the spaced armor on the mantlet was never fitted.

For those who are wondering, Ostketten only became available in May 1944, but a very few Panzer IIIs that survived this long were fitted with them.

As it might have been clear by now, it is difficult to judge a Panzer III Ausf.N without knowing it's lineage that goes back to the Ausf.J.

 

2. So where does this leave us?

Those of you that have been paying attention until now know that a Pz.Kpfw. III Ausf.N can be anything from a war weary, early Ausf.J with a stubby gun slapped onto it to a brand new, state of the art, end of production, new-built infantry support tank. So which one is Dragon trying to sell us here?
The boxtop indicates that we are looking at a vehicle from the second batch, as these are the only ones fitted with the single lid cupola, from March 1943. The Schürzen and lack of Nebelkerzen indicate that the time frame is May 1943, or later. (Too late for Tunisia, but in time for Kursk.) This does not necessarily mean the vehicle was produced after May 1943, as Schürzen could be retrofitted and Nebelkerzen removed, but it was definitely not produced before March 1943.
When we look further into the manual, we see that this vehicle is indeed based on the Ausf. M, keeping the deep-wading muffler. If you don't want to install the deep-wading muffler, then you can use the PE part that is included (not for use) instead.

 

3. Quality and accuracy

By October 1942 the turret splash guard should have completely disappeared, because the spaced armor on the driver's plate effectively took over the role (as it protruded slightly above the roof level). As this kit represents a vehicle that is not produced before March 1943, it should go.
The holes for the driver's periscope are still there. While we go into this in more detail in §4, one should note that the driver's periscope openings were dropped in February 1943, while the new cupola was introduced a month later. The earlier cupola is still provided in the kit, however, and has separate hatches, while the new cupola only has the closed hatch (for reasons I still cannot grasp and even though it is shown open in the boxtop artwork). The modeler can thus choose to install the earlier cupola (and install a crew figure), leave the periscope openings unharmed and just assume the Schürzen have been added in the field and the Nebelkerzen removed as ordered in May 1943.
By this time, I would also expect it to have an AA mount for the commander, which the kit lacks.

An outline of the side escape hatches is present on the hull, which needs to be sanded smooth. The instructions don't mention this. It's easy enough to do, and might even be hidden behind the Schürzen.
About the Schürzen: the small segments that were sometimes seen at the extreme ends are missing. Check your references for the particular vehicle you want to build. The segments you do get are nicely staggered, though.
Robert Kru also points out to us that the brackets for the turret Schürzen have a twist which no other kit in the past has had. This doesn't necessarily mean they are wrong, as clear photographs of these parts (showing the presence or absence of a slight twist) are hard to come by.

On the left fender there is a small base for part b4 (the headlight). This base is not present on the right fender for its headlight. Actually, the base on the left fender is for the Notek, which was fitted to earlier versions of the tank. It should not be here for this tank.

A slight annoyance is the lack of tabs in the turret ring to keep the turret in place. This is something almost all kits have had as long as I can remember, and I feel attached to them.

While Dragon's slide mould technology has given us some gems in the past, the armored covers on the rear engine deck lack any sign of undercut. Remember that these are covers for openings in the hatches that let the air out (or in). The way Dragon represents them there is no way any air will ever get into (or out of) the engine compartment. What is more depressing is that these covers were separate parts in the earlier released StuG III. Dragon has clearly started to downgrade its newer declinations of previously released kits.

The instructions are somewhat of a hit-and-miss.
As far as I can tell, part A5 is not called for in the instructions, while it is clearly needed for the rear lower hull. Staying at the rear hull for a while, the parts b11 and b12 in the instructions are actually b11+b13 and b12+b14.
Something that the uninitiated might fail to catch is that the new cupola comes in a lower and upper part. The instructions (including the parts lay-out) only show a single piece, called "C". In fact there are two parts, "C1" and "C2".
Something else, which is a bit odd, is that the tracks are to be installed in Step 9, while the Schürzen go on in Step 8. Good luck with that. The experienced modeler will get around this, of course, but the novice may learn a new expletive in the process.
I also noticed that part A37 (the antenna) is labelled as B15 (which is in fact a Schürzen bracket). About the antenna: it is molded in the stowed position. Modeling it in the upright position will require some cutting.

All of the above might be categorized as minor nitpicking, which it is, really. What I cannot understand is why the instructions want us to install the spaced armor on the mantlet. This was not compatible with the weight of the L/24 gun and thus not fitted. Of course, as there is no German word for never, there is always an exception and no sooner had we published this preview as Patryk Placzek sent us the following picture. This is so far the only vehicle in this configuration that we have found.

To add insult to injury, the gun recuperator housing that the kit provides is for the KwK38 L/60 gun, not the L/24 gun. (Thanks to Patryk Placzek for pointing this out to us.)


L/60 on the left, L/24 on the right.

Another annoying omission are the spare tracks for the nose. The lower rack is present, but no tracks are provided, even though they are shown in the boxtop and on the color profiles. The bar for more tracks between the ventilation covers is absent. Easy enough to scratchbuild the rack, but an omission nevertheless. Finding tracks will be another matter, though.

Yet another error that can be categorized as more or less serious is the lack of an armor plate on the lower nose. Robert Kru pointed this out to us (see drawing below) and also noticed that this plate is lacking in all of Dragon's Panzer III kits, while it is included in Dragon's StuG III kits (although in the latter kit it is of the bolted variety).
It's a simple matter of adding some plasticard, but it should have been included.

On the positive side, Dragon has given the correct offset between left and right roadwheels (which most manufacturers today seem to have noticed). They have also corrected the instructions so that they now no longer show the tracks installed upside down (as they did in previous declinations of the Panzer III)

We get 5 marking options (see scan above). (Note that this section has been updated thanks to the help of Timothy Lau.)

  1. 2 Pz.Div. Kursk,1943. This unit had this type of vehicle and it was present at Kursk.
    It seems that the Panzer IIIs of this division carried an extra box on the rear, cf. [4] and pictures below sent by Patryk Placzek.
    The marking instructions are a bit confusing, though, at least in my opinion. The instructions tell you that 6 and 7 are "optional". Marking 6 is (incidentally) a "6" and marking 7 is (if I interpret this correctly) either "1", "2" or "3".
    I should check which combinations are correct, but the pictures show that at least some of the Ausf.N were indeed from the second production batch.


    Note that this vehicle has Nebelkerzen on the turret, which are not mentioned in the instructions, but given in the sprues.
    Also note that the use of the decals in this kit and the spare 5cm L/60 barrel might allow you to convert your Ausf.N to an earlier version used by 2 Pz.Div..

  2. 6 Pz.Div.Kursk,1943.
    A drawing was found in [4], which shows extra sections of Schürzen. The pictures of this vehicle below sent by Patryk Placzek seem to contradict this. The vehicle is clearly from the second production batch.

    Note that this vehicle has Nebelkerzen on the turret, which are not mentioned in the instructions, but given in the sprues.
  3. 18 Pz.Div.Kursk,1943.
    This is most likely the captured vehicle seen here and in and [6]. The photo in [6] confirms it is from the 2nd production batch.
    Note that this vehicle has Nebelkerzen on the turret, which are not mentioned in the instructions, but given in the sprues.
  4. Pz.Brig. Norwegen, Norway, 1945.
    A drawing was found in [4], which shows extra sections of Schürzen.
    [1] shows photographs. The picture of a vehicle of the 2nd production run had hull Schürzen with an extra segment at the front and Zimmerit. The one from the 1st prduction run did not have Schürzen, but had Zimmerit. At least one vehicle had both Zimmerit and Schürzen. A picture of Ausf.N in Norway can also be found here, here or here.
    Note that some of these vehicle had Nebelkerzen on the turret, which are not mentioned in the instructions, but given in the sprues.
  5. Pz.Abt.212, Western Front, 1944.
    This unit spent most of 1944 on Crete. In September 1944 it was transferred to Yugoslavia and took over the Panzers (incl. Pz.Kpfw.III ausf.N) from Pz.abt.208 [5]. One picture of a Panzer III Ausf. N of Pz.Abt.212 unit can be found in [5], but it had different markings (and it carried Zimmerit). The same reference show quite a number of Pz.Kpfw.III Ausf.N from Pz.Abt.208 and it can be assumed that their appearance did not change much after transfer. Most of the Ausf.N seen in [5] are from the 2nd production series, carry turret Schürzen, but no hull Schürzen (as the instructions show). Most of these had Balkenkreuze and numbers on the turret Schürzen. One vehicle seems to be devoid of markings (as in the kit instructions) but carried Zimmerit.
    Conclusion: I think this is not a vehicle from the Western Front.
    Furthermore, the instructions don't tell you the Schürzen are optional.

A general note about the marking options: the instructions show a cleaning rod sticking out from behind the Schürzen. This is not part of the kit, but pictures of the real vehicles seem to confirm that none of them actually carried it.

4. Conversion possibilities

Looking at the parts layout, and the sprues (Dragon is known to offer some discrepancies between both in some of their kits), we notice we get the following spare parts.

  • Sprue A
    • Older type cupola with separate split hatches. We already discussed this, but a spare cupola will always be nice for those that want to build some type of Beutepanzer, as a lot of these (whatever the type) were modified with the German cupola.
    • An optional right rear mudflap that goes with the Ausf. J and Ausf. L that had the small light on the right rear fender.
    • Nebelkerzen.
    • Hull escape hatches.
  • Sprue a. Only two parts are needed from this sprue, the rest are spares.
    • Exhaust deflector.
    • Front tow couplings.
    • Small headlights, taillight and Notek.
    • Nose plate with external hinges (correct for Ausf.J/L).
    • Ausf.J/L exhaust.
  • Sprue b. No spare parts according to the manual, but it does carry a spare L/60 barrel. This sprue is typical for the Ausf. M.
  • Sprue B. No spare parts. This sprue carries Schürzen and fittings.
  • Sprue D. No spare parts. This sprue carries the running gear.
  • Upper hull.
  • Lower hull.
  • Late type cupola.
  • Tracks.
  • PE.

Note that the way some parts are attached to the extremities of the sprue is bound to damage them. Cut them off as soon as possible.

 

Similarities with other kits are as follows

Sprue
7372
(Ausf. J Late)
7385
(Ausf. L)
7290
(Ausf.M)

7323
(Ausf. M
with Schürzen)

7386
(Ausf. N "DAK"
based on Ausf.L)
7407
(Ausf. N
based on Ausf.M)
A With spaced mantlet and turret visors With spaced mantlet but without turret visors With spaced mantlet With spaced mantlet but without turret visors Lacks spaced mantlet and turret visors.
Side escape hatches not shown in parts diagram but provided.
With spaced mantlet but without turret visors.
B Not included Not included A Sprue "B" is included, but this is the same as that called "b" in the other kits, i.e. the one carrying the typical Ausf. M parts. Included. Different sprue lay-out from the sprue in 7407. Not included Included
C Not included Not included Not included Not included Not included Included
D Included Included Included Included Included Included
F Not included Actually part of sprue "b" Not included ???? Not included Not included
a Without 75mm gun Without 75mm gun Not included Not included Included Included
b Included Part of sprue b included and labeled as "F". A Sprue "B" is included, but this is the same as that called "b" in the other kits, i.e. the one carrying the typical Ausf. M parts. Included Not included Included
Upper hull Has turret splash guard
No turret splash guard No turret splash guard No turret splash guard
No turret splash guard Has turret splash guard
PE MA (as shown above) MA + MB (as shown above) MA + MB (as shown above) MB (as shown above) + PE Schürzen. MA + MB (as shown above) MA + MB (as shown above)

What does the table above teach us? Well, that kit 7407 actually carries all the parts that can be found in all other Dragon kits of the Panzer III combined, except the lateral turret visors. The turret splash guard is an oddity, as kit 7407 does not need it (like all kits that have spaced armor on the driver's front plate), and while Dragon has not included it for the kits of the Ausf.L to Ausf.M it re-appeared on one of the Ausf.N kits. At the same time the ready-made models based on this kit do not seem to have it. This might actually mean that some of the kits of 7407 actually have an upper hull without splash guard as Dragon sometimes seems to correct mistakes on the fly.
At any rate, if you have a copy of kit 7407 with a splash guard, it's best to remove it, but as removing is easier than adding, it eases the conversion possibilities.

Note that 7372 represents a very late Ausf.J due to the gun, engine dack and spaced armor, making it very much an Ausf.L with turret visors. This makes this kit (7407) the most polyvalent of them all, as you can build it almost like any other kit, apart from the decals. (I am sure you will find the manual of the other kits somewhere online to guide you with this.)
What the Schürzen are concerned. Kit 7323 has a different sprue lay-out for the Schürzen, but (judging from information found on the internet) the parts are externally similar to those in kit 7407. This would make sense, as 7407 basically represents a re-armed Ausf.M, so there is no real reason to change the Schürzen.
If only it also carried those two small turret visors as well, it would have been a real winner in my eyes !

After this review was published my eye fell on a picture in Stephen Brezinski's review of the "other" Ausf.N. After checking with him, it seems that his copies kits 7372 and 7386 lack the anti-grid pattern on the fenders. This seemed strange as the StuG III kits from Dragon have the anti-grid pattern and kit 7407 has it as well. At some time, Dragon must have realized their mistake and corrected the fenders in the latest Panzer III kit. As these are on sprue "A", which is included in all the kits, Dragon might include the corrected sprue in new batches of all the kits that were previously released with smooth fenders. Indeed, it seems this has already happened with kit 7372 as Timothy Lau's copy does have the anti-skid pattern.

As the kit, built accoring to the instructions, represents the last production configuration (except for the AA mount) there is little scope for postdating this vehicle. But what about pre-dating or conversion?

 

4.1. Conversion to an Ausf. J

Keeping scratchbuilding to an acceptable level, only the very late (March 1942) Ausf. J can be built. Even then, turret visors will need to be found somewhere and the turret splash needs to be kept. The hull spaced armor mounting must be shaved off.

4.2. Conversion to an Ausf. L

Conversion to some batches of the Ausf. L are possible (cf § 1.2), as the small lights for the fenders, hull escape hatches, externally hinged transmission hatches, etc. are included.
Building a version without spaced armor is doable, but will require the removal of their mountings that are molded with the upper hull.
Building a vehicle with only the mantlet Vorpanzer frame (but not the extra armor itself) will require some scratchbuilding.
Building a very early Ausf. L will require scratchbuilding the turret visors, which started to disappear in March 1942.
For all conversions that do not have the spaced armor for the driver's plate the turret splash guard needs to be kept.
Of course, the 5cm L/60 should be used on this version.

4.3. Conversion to an Ausf. M

As the version that this kit depicts is hardly more than a very late Ausf.M with a stubby gun, conversion is straightforward, respecting § 1.3. All parts that are required are included in the kit. The spaced armor should be fitted, but note that the sides of the mantlet armor should be open. (The kit part is correct for an early Ausf.L.)

4.4. Conversion to a model of the Ausf.N from the first production batch.
Check §1.4.1 and §4.2 and build the vehicle as an Ausf.L. Except for the very first of this batch, that still might have had turret visors, you can easiliy build any tank from this production run.

4.5. Conversion to another model of the Ausf.N from the second production batch.
This is fairly simple (cf. §1.4.2.). It's just a matter of not correcting the driver's periscope holes, replacing the cupola, omitting the Schürzen and/or adding the Nebelkerzen. All of this is provided in the kit.

4.6. Conversion to a model of the Ausf.N from the third production batch.
This is also simple. Build the kit as an Ausf. J, L or M (cf. § 4.1, 4.2 or 4.3 respectively) and replace the gun by the L/24 with its mantlet. As noted, if you chose the Ausf.J conversion, turret visors are called for.

 

5. Further remarks about the other Pz.Kpfw.III kits (by Timothy Lau)

5.1. 7372 Ausf. J Late

This kit can basically represent everything from December 1941 (engine decks with single hatches, longitudinally placed ventilation covers) except for the lack of visor on the right side of the gun mantlet, which (without correction) would limit it to an Ausf.J built between March and April 1942.

Note that, because Dragon was lazy, it did not completely fix the mold of the upper hull from the other kits to adapt it to the lack of the spaced armor on the front. (It did, however, add the turret splash guard.) So the builder (at least of tank "523" of 22. Pz.Div. as seen in the decals) must scrape off the mountings for the spaced armor. Actually, almost anyone who builds the model would need to do this bit of surgery.

The vehicle from 24 Pz.Div. would at least need the extra mantlet visor, as does the Wiking vehicle that are both given in the marking options. Note that the Wiking insgnia is on the decal sheet, but the instructions fail to mention it.

There is no need to buy this kit instead of 7407 unless you want the visors, and the decals.


5.2. 7385 Ausf. L Late


This kit lacks the turret splash guard and has optional Nebelkerzen for the turret, so it can represent everything from:
06-10/42: Turret splash guard gradually disappears. (It is no longer needed because of the height of the extra armor in front of the driver.); hull side escape hatches gradually disappear.
09/42: Bosch headlights replace Notek; tow coupling installed (also retrofitted); Nebelkerzen installed on turret and droppped at rear.
10/42: Rear convoy light replaced by cylindrical light; Winterketten available.
05/43: Nebelkerzen removed.
To the end of Ausf. L: no AA mount.

There is no need to buy this kit instead of 7407 unless you want the decals.


5.3. 7290 Ausf. M with wading muffler

There is no need to buy this kit instead of 7323 or even 7407 unless you want the decals.

5.4. 7323 Ausf. M with Schurzen

This kit can represent everything from:
10/42: Rear convoy light replaced by cylindrical light; 10/42: Winterketten available.
05/43: Nebelkerzen removed; Schürzen fiited (also available for retrofit).

As with kit 7407, it lacks the AA mount, which would have probably been fitted to the real vehicle.
Compared with kit 7407 this kit has PE for the Schürzen but lacks the PE for the engine vents.


5.5. 7386 Ausf. N DAK

This kit represents an Ausf. N derived from an Ausf. L. but without visors and turret splash guard. It also lacks the AA mount.
The kit is called DAK because the decals are "Afrika," but I don't think this version only operated in Afrika.
There is no reason to buy this kit instead of 7407 unless you want the decals.

 

 

References

[1] Panzerkampfwagen III Ausf. J, L, M und N, Panzer Tracts 3-3, T.L. Jentz & H.L. Doyle.
(This is, together with [2], actually about the only book you really must have. The others are complementary, even contradictory, but might contain many more photos.)
[2] Panzerkampfwagen III Ausf. E,F,G und H, Panzer Tracts 3-2, T.L. Jentz & H.L. Doyle.
[3] Achtung Panzer 2: Panzerkampfwagen III, Dai Nippon Kaiga
[4] The Panzerkampfwagen III at war, M. Jerchel & W. Trojca. Concord Publications
[5] Deutsche Panzereinheiten in der OZAK, S. Di Gusto, Tankograd Publishing
[6] La bataille de Kursk, F. De Lannoy, Editions Heimdal

Preview sample purchased (in multiples) by the author.

Dragon kits can be purchased from Tracks & Troops

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Article Last Updated:
27 October 2014
05 November 2014
22 September 2017
28 September 2017